By Ramie Churchill

 

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4100 S 4th St Leavenworth, KS 66048

 

Backgrounder

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

May 5th, 2020                                                                FOR MORE INFORMATION: 

Ramie Churchill

Digital Communications Student

Ramie.Churchill@my.stmary.edu

 

                                                                               Sisters of Charity

The Sisters of Charity of Leavenworth Kansas was founded in Leavenworth in 1858 by Mother Xavier Ross. In the first week of arrival to Leavenworth, the sisters started teaching in a boys’ school. Following this, the Sisters opened an academy for girls. They started visiting wagon trains and traveling to different locations to tend the sick during epidemics. The sisters went on to educate the black children that had fled to Kansas since it was the free state. They took in orphans and visited the prisoners. They wanted anyone who needed help to receive it.

Later in 1864, the Sisters went on to open the first private hospital in Kansas. Sister Joanna Bruner taught nursing to other Sisters so that they could better help the community. In 1869 The Sisters of Charity of Leavenworth came to the Montana gold camp of Helena because the Jesuits sent them an invitation. The Sisters were needed to teach the youth, care for orphans, and minister to the sick in the frontier community. While they were helping them, they also founded the first orphanage called St. Joseph’s Home. After this, they moved on to found St. Joseph Hospital in Denver, Colorado in 1873. Sisters of Charity of Leavenworth next went on to open the University of Saint Mary in Leavenworth Kansas, along with St. Francis Health Center in Topeka and Saint John’s Health Center in Santa Monica, California. Between 1864 and 1952, they went on to create and take responsibility for 18 different hospitals from Kansas to California. Once the hospitals were up and running, they would move on to the next place that needed their help.

The Sisters community has deep roots in Vincentian tradition. The Vincentian tradition is just following in the spirit of St. Vincent in service to the poor and marginalized. Their roots are in the spirituality and outreach that is on the outreach of St. Vincent de Paul and St. Louise de Marillac. They both served in 17th century France. Both of their ministries and influence4s to help in the founding of different communities of women religious groups in the United States. The Sisters continue to be faithful to their lifelong service of helping those who need it most. They are to teach to heal and to care for orphans. When USM was first established it housed an orphanage and they would help their community. Today they adapt to the times and do what is needed for their community to help.

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Ramie Churchill is a junior at the University of Saint Mary studying Digital Communications.